The Rannock Legacy

The Rannock Legacy

Gratefully acknowledge and duly recognise the author Jeanette Gower, Box 989 STRATHALBYN SA 5255

Refer also: Australian Stock Horse, May/June 2019, pp 64 – 67

Featured Image: ‘Rannock’ by Peter Gower

Part 1

The story of Rannock is that of a horse which has been under the radar for a long time. This is partly because of his South Australian location, away from mainstream ASH breeding, but also because so many of the resulting descendants have been unregistered. Yet the Rannock influence has been incredible, considering the lack of opportunity. It is also the story of the families involved, families who knew the lines well and wanted to keep them into perpetuity. Perhaps not unsurprisingly then, the line is gaining new attention, due to its long-standing record of producing smart, good looking and reliable,  traditional stock horses which are a true HSH outcross to most ASH lines today.

RANNOCK was bred by RJ (Bob) Mackay, “Tinagroo” Scone, NSW, breeder of the famous foundation sire Panzer, to whom Rannock is inbred. Foaled a little over 50 years ago in 1967, Rannock was by Dundee (by Panzer) x Tinagroo Mersa (by Panzer) a half brother/half sister cross. All the immediate ancestors were high class polo ponies in their own right. Panzer’s dam, Nellie was a polo pony, foal recorded in the ASB studbook in 1933 but never raced due to the outbreak of WWII. She too was inbred to the Sydney Cup winning mare Diffidence which was purchased as a 17 year old by JK and WH Mackay for 900 guineas in 1913, a princely sum!

The Mackays bred Thoroughbreds to race, and like a lot of owners of the day, used them on the property after retirement. Mersa’s dam Ranmena was a successful racehorse, which also went on to become a good polo pony.

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From Russia with Love

From Russia with Love

Acknowledge: Newcastle & Hunter Valley Racing Association Publication ‘From the Track’

See also: http://www.danceaustralia.com.au/news/vale-anna-volkova-1917-2013

See also: https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/dance/ballets-russes-star-dies-at-96-20130821-2sair.html

Fore Note (WPH): I think this story rivals ‘A Town Like Alice’? Are there any emerging Neville Shutes out there?

Jamie Barnes may be a familiar face around Hunter & Central Coast race courses but his amazing heritage would be a surprise to most.

The Broadmeadow-based vet is the son of a champion Australian rower and a world famous Russian Ballerina, whose remarkable love story is an amazing tale in itself.

His mother, Anna Barnes nee Volkova, is now 93* and living in a retirement village in Sydney. His father, Jim Barnes, passed away several years ago.

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Sir Samuel Hordern, ‘Wilton Park’ and Fred Day

Sir Samuel Hordern, ‘Wilton Park’ and Fred Day

Featured Image: Acknowledge ‘History of Veterinary Practice in Newmarket 1831 – 2011’ (Multiple Authors). Fred Day at Lordship & Egerton Studs was the grandson of Fred Day who worked with Sir Samuel Hordern in Sydney and the Southern Highlands of NSW late 19th century

See: https://kingsoftheturf.com/1901-samuel-hordern-the-wilton-park-stud/

Thank you Ian Ibbett yet again! There are many remarkable coincidences which crop up in life. Just as the Hordern name is synonymous with excellence in retail, pastoral, sailing and racing pursuits in Sydney NSW so the surname Day resonates with equal intensity in racing, training and equine veterinary practice in Newmarket, Suffolk, England UK. I was astonished to read in Ian Ibbett’s seminal treatise (see above) that the two titans combined in the late 1890s to promulgate Sir Samuel Hordern’s early ambitions in thoroughbred racing and breeding. Fred Day later returned to the UK where he established a training and equine veterinary dynasty in Newmarket. My own equine practice in Scone (now Scone Equine Group) has enjoyed a symbiotic ‘shuttle’ relationship with the latter over the past 50+ years. This is recorded in meticulously detail by the multi-authored ‘History of Veterinary Practice in Newmarket 1831 – 2011’ (published First Edition 2011). I think my own much more modest tome ‘The Infinitive History of Veterinary Practice in Scone (2006)’ might have had something to do with the naissance of this?

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Aberdeen Jockey Club 1898 – 1971

Aberdeen Jockey Club 1898 – 1971

Written by Harley Walden in 2000; from the ‘Harley Walden Archive’ now at the Scone & Upper Hunter Historical Society

See also: https://www.scone.com.au/the-aberdeen-jockey-cub/

Featured Image: Arthur Taylor was Aberdeen Jockey Club’s treasurer for 32 years, until 1959, when he took over as President until 1969; Shown here with Mrs Alec Johnstone, selling tickets for a war effort race meeting in the early 1940s

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Bypass and Kelly Street Conundrum

Bypass and Kelly Street Conundrum

Featured Image: Acknowledge ‘The Way We Were’; A Pictorial History of the Scone District 1901 – 2001 by Anne McMullin, Kath Farrell and Audrey Entwisle; Federation Publication No 4; Published by Scone and Upper Hunter Historical Society Inc. 2002

The ‘unknown identity’ at the opening ceremony is Cr Gerard Dupal who was a Muswellbrook-based lawyer also elected onto the Muswellbrook Shire Council. He was a relative newcomer who lived on a property near Broad Crossing. The NSW Electoral Commission later changed the rules so that no single individual could serve on two LGAs concurrently. Cr Dupal left the district not long after.

“Community to expect lag between Scone Bypass opening and Kelly Street revitalisation works beginning”

‘Bumps in the Road’: Caitlin Reid put it very well in ‘The Scone Advocate’. See below. I attended the meeting. There was a lot of information and still many issues to resolve. However we will work our way through them and I look forward to eventual resolution. It’s been a long journey since the original New England Highway construction 1826 – 1832! There’ve been a few iterations to say the least. The one depicted in the featured image might have been the major ‘reiteration’? I remember it well!

See: https://www.sconeadvocate.com.au/story/6593456/bypass-imminent-but-revitalisation-hits-road-bump/?cs=1533

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Polo Hall of Fame: Ponies to Remember

Polo Hall of Fame: Ponies to Remember

See: https://www.nswpolo.com.au/Assets/News/689/2013-Hall-of-Fame-Ponies-to-Remember.pdf

Featured Image: ‘Chester’ and owner Bob Hannon; Bob was a business partner of the late Bob Oatley when based in PNG in the 1960s. Scroll down the website for tributes to Martini, Tasman, Suva, Chips, Maria Tod, Tuesday, Jessica, Treskaa, Pinky, Castinette, Princess, Panzer and Patch.

Chester

A liver chestnut thoroughbred gelding by Baguette out of Tiny Touch bred by Jim Gibson and Blue Brotherton. (The late Jim Gibson and Robert ‘Blue’ Brotherton were two of my best mates while working at Kia Ora where Baguette stood. Could ‘Chester’ have been conceived ‘under cover of darkness’?) Blue bred and raced ‘Tiny Touch’ (by Skymaster stallion ‘Touchdown’ (imp) standing at Jack Sheppard’s ‘Gyarran Stud’, Muswellbrook. Blue worked there as well!

Author’s note: My good mate Robert (‘Carrot’) Bowen insists ‘Chester’ was actually by Kia Ora based stallion ‘Imagele’ (by ‘Sostenuto’). He concedes that ‘under cover of darkness’ Jim and Blue might have led the wrong stallion into the serving barn? ‘Carrot’ was responsible for the sale of ‘Chester’ to Bob Hannon as a Polocrosse Pony when he was initially kept at Bob Oatley’s ‘Rosemount’ property at Denman/Sandy Hollow. (Telephone call Sunday 5th January 2020)

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Baramul Stud Dispersal: Shipping Transport to the USA 1970

Baramul Stud Dispersal: Shipping Transport to the USA 1970

Featured Image: Horses in stalls on deck as arranged on the ‘Parrakoola’ (Photo courtesy of John Gilder)

In July 1970 I was extremely fortunate to accompany the last major shipment of horses to traverse the wild Pacific to west coast USA as attendant veterinarian. The MS ‘Parrakoola’ was a modern Swedish-registered container vessel circumnavigating the vast ocean in pursuit of trade. This was my first and only exposure to life on the ocean waves and the vicissitudes of a merchant seaman! What an experience in life skills and people as well as animal management training! My co-strappers were Malcolm Ayoub who has recently achieved national notoriety as the guru for Jim Cassidy. Malcolm was a colourful racing identity encompassing in spades all the skills and attributes the sobriquet implies! Jack Flood, my boss, was a magnificent horseman of the old school and a firm and loyal friend of his equally impeccable employer and gentleman John Inglis. Like John he became my much respected mentor, advocate and confidant until his ultimate demise some years ago. With three of us to care for 84 horses for a month the job was ahead! Malcolm was occasionally AWOL with some psychological baggage.

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Hoof Prints: Leaving a Legacy

Hoof Prints: Leaving a Legacy

Featured Image: Horse Hoof Prints in the sand; acknowledgment ‘depositphotos’

The image is a very poignant because it’s both momentarily transitory; and intangible. The next high tide will eliminate it/them forever leaving a blank canvas. In the infinity of time how ‘permanent’ are any of our imprints? In this context read as follows.

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Harry R Hayes

Harry R Hayes: ‘Breakfast at Harry’s’

Featured Image: Harry Hayes (‘HRH’) (As I write this I’m delighted that Harry Hayes’ great grandson Chester Hall has just won a Bishop Essay Prize for his treatise on ‘HRH’. This little bit helped).

Harry was legendary! He enjoyed the good life but only because he invested in it what he hoped to receive with interest in return. He made adequate preparation by working 25 hours per day then take some time to celebrate the effort. Racing and breeding were his enduring passions after his primary interests of cattle raising, grazing and the meat industry. He was rightfully honoured by the State for his highly significant contribution to community and sporting affairs.

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