Scone Veterinary Protégés IV Dr Richard Malik

Scone Veterinary Protégés IV Dr Richard Malik

Dr Richard Malik DVSc DipVetAn MVetClinStud PhD FACVSc FASM MASID

OK I’m stretching it a bit. It’s what I do best. With over 50 years in veterinary practice and ancillary activities one sees and meets hundreds, if not thousands of undergraduate veterinary students. Most of these seek exposure and experience in ‘real life’ veterinary practice. Think ‘All Creatures Great and Small’. This latter is s a VERY ideological purview. Do I remember them all? Of course I don’t. However a select few are eminently memorable for a variety of reasons. Some of it is blatantly ‘sexist’. Good looking women are very pleasing to the eye; I freely admit.

Someone who is eminently memorable for all the right reasons is Dr Richard Malik. It might be as much as forty years ago. Richard turned up at Scone Veterinary Hospital (then Morgan Howey & Fraser and Partners) straight out of Sydney University. Immediately one knew Richard was ‘different’. He did not fit the ‘old bastard from the bush’, outback-and-way-back mould. Neither was he your average Caucasian private school ‘rugger bugger’ type. Richard had a ferocious intellect and fiercely academic mien. Our aged partner Frank Williams was intrigued. Stroking his droopy moustache as was his wont he intoned to me in his uniquely bucolic way: “Bill, what have we got here? What have we got here”?

Richard was a most attentive student; although I doubt equine and cattle practice was his go? It was mandatory for ingénue veterinarians to explore all avenues. There was one item which attracted Richard’s rapt attention. We were just trialling the use of ‘Xylazine’ and ‘Ketamine’ in combination as induction/anaesthetic agents for short term surgical procedures in horses. I was greatly relieved when my ‘demonstration’ proved faultless. I think even Richard was impressed?

Since then Richard and I have crossed paths often; mainly through the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science; University of Sydney (PGFVS). This is now known as Continuing Veterinary Education (CVE). Scone actually boasts as the ‘genesis’ of all the Directors of the PGFVS since Tom Hungerford. Doug Bryden came as an undergraduate with his elder brother John who practiced with Murray Bain. Both Michele Cotton and present Director Hugh White were undergraduate students. I’m still there!

Richard pursued a career in teaching and research in feline medicine. He has become a world leader (see below). I’m not surprised. At one International Meeting Richard said ‘he wanted to become the greatest cat veterinarian in the world’. He might have achieved it? Despite many lucrative offers from many Universities in the United States, Richard has remained firmly ‘grounded’ in Sydney despite some unjustifiable local rancour.

Richard is also a farmer of note. He has produced first-class prizewinning fleeces from his flock of one pastured at his eyrie in the Blue Mountains. He also hosts a sanctuary for displaced ‘Brumbies’ and a herd of splendidly horned goats. I think his forte is still ‘herding cats’ however?

He is one of the most passionate and patriotic Australians I have met. His family were part of the noxious diabolical diaspora following cataclysmic events in Europe in the 1930s and 1940s. Richard is determined to repay the selected country of their/his choice for the opportunities it has provided. I’m in the same boat, almost literally! Richard has excelled; me less so.

University of Sydney / Faculty of Science / People / Our Staff / Academic Staff / Dr Richard Malik

http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/richard.malik.php

Richard Malik DVSc DipVetAn MVetClinStud PhD FACVSc FASM

Biographical Details

Richard Malik is a one of the world’s most respected and well known feline veterinarians. After graduating from the University of Sydney in 1981 he initially trained in anaesthesia and intensive care with Jan Ilkiw and Kathy Brock at Sydney University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. This was followed by a PhD (neuropharmacology) in the Department of Pharmacology at the John Curtin School of Medical Research (ANU). He then moved to the Neurobiology Research Centre at the University of Sydney studying the development and plasticity of neuromuscular connections. In 1987 he returned to the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences as its first Resident in Small Animal Medicine. He remained in the “vet school” for 16 years in varying capacities and was the Valentine Charlton Senior Lecturer in Feline Medicine from 1995 to 2002. Currently Richard works as a consultant for the Centre for Veterinary Education, various private clinics in the eastern suburbs of Sydney (principally Double Bay Veterinary Clinic) and also for the RSPCA. He is also involved in a large number of collaborative research projects in both pure and applied research, typically in collaboration with academic staff in the Veterinary Science Faculty. He is passionate about all aspects of feline medicine, and has a special focus on treating common diseases using new therapeutic regimens. His current research areas include genetic diseases of cats and dogs, infectious diseases of cats and dogs, parasitic diseases of cats and dogs. More specifically, he is a world authority on mycobacterial diseases, fungal diseases including cryptococcosis, antibacterial and antifungal drug therapy and neural angiostrongliasis

https://www.cve.edu.au/staff/richard-malik

Valentine Charlton Consultant

Richard Malik DVSc DipVetAn MVetClinStud PhD FACVSc FASM

Richard Malik has been involved with the PGF/CVE for nearly 30 years, having been invited by the Director at the time, Dr Doug Bryden, to help provide continuing veterinary education. Richard travelled widely for the PGF particularly running TimeOut seminars in regional Australia and has lectured at conferences on numerous occasions. Richard currently works as a consultant for the Centre for Veterinary Education, various private clinics in the eastern suburbs of Sydney and also for the RSPCA. He is also involved in a large number of collaborative research projects in both pure and applied research. He is passionate about all aspects of feline medicine, with a reputation as one of the world’s most respected and well known feline veterinarians. He loves his farm, stocked with many pets including horses, sheep, goats, alpacas and two special moggies, an 11-year old girl called Miss Binks and a young B&W cat called Obie. Richard is also an Adjunct Professor of Small Animal Medicine at Charles Sturt University and continues to speak regularly internationally and at CVE events.

After graduating from the University of Sydney in 1981 he trained in anaesthesia and intensive care at Sydney University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, followed by a PhD in the Department of Pharmacology at the John Curtin School of Medical Research (ANU). Richard then moved to the Neurobiology Research Centre at the University of Sydney studying the development of neuromuscular connections. In 1987 he returned to the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences as its first Resident in Small Animal Medicine. He remained in the vet school for 16 years in varying capacities and was the Valentine Charlton Senior Lecturer in Feline Medicine from 1995 to 2002.

https://www.cve.edu.au/speakers/richard-malik

Dr Richard Malik DVSc DipVetAn MVetClinStud PhD FACVSc FASM

Richard Malik graduated from the University of Sydney in 1981 and spent his first year training in anaesthesia and intensive care at Sydney University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. This was followed by a PhD in the Department of Pharmacology at the John Curtin School of Medical Research (ANU). Dr Malik then moved to the Neurobiology Research Centre at the University of Sydney studying the development of neuromuscular connections. In 1987 he returned to the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences as its first Resident in Small Animal Medicine. He remained in the vet school for 16 years in varying capacities and was the Valentine Charlton Senior Lecturer in Feline Medicine from 1995 to 2002. Richard works as a consultant for the Centre for Veterinary Education, various private clinics in the eastern suburbs of Sydney and also for the RSPCA. He is also involved in a large number of collaborative research projects in both pure and applied research. He is passionate about all aspects of feline medicine, and has a special focus on treating common diseases using new therapeutic regimens. He also has a farm, with many pets including horses, sheep, goats and alpacas. Richard is an Adjunct Professor of Small Animal Medicine at Charles Sturt University.