Royal Hub-capping?

Royal Hub-capping?

Featured Image: The then Governor General her Excellency Quentin Bryce at the opening of the Australian Stock Horse National Championships at White Park, Scone during my term of office as Councillor on the Upper Hunter Shire Council 2008 – 2012. I think it was about 2010?

Dame Quentin Bryce is about to shake my hand while my spouse Sarah and Councillor Pam Seccombe line up on my immediate right. Also in the picture are local NSW State Member for Upper Hunter; the Honourable George Souris MP and his spouse Vassie. I think this was about as close as I ever became to ‘Royal Hub-capping’?

The venue at White Park is where the 120 mounted Olympic Horsemen and women had trained for the opening ceremony of the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000.

Little did Dame Quentin Bryce realise she had already met my son Hugh? When she was Warden of Women’s College, Sydney University my son was Senior Student at the intimately located St Pauls College for men. It was traditional for the senior student to race naked at midnight around the quadrangle embracing both Colleges at the Annual College Dinner in July. Guess what? Warden Bryce was entertaining Margaret and Goff Whitlam plus then Police Commissioner Peter Ryan and Mrs Ryan for dinner. They emerged just as Hugh was navigating the Women’s College piazza! It’s a long story of restitution!

HUGH HOWEY & ‘WOOL’

Hugh Howey & ‘Wool’

JANUARY 6, 2018

UNCATEGORIZEDWAYFINDERWAYFINDINGWOOLWRITING

Happy New Year

Featured Image: Hugh Howey (USA) and my son Hugh Howey at a ‘Wool’ book launch in Sydney about 10 years ago?

I’m sitting here in Tasmania, on the other side of the world from the small farming town in which I grew up, reflecting on the wild adventure my life has become. This past year was one of the best of my life, even as it contained some of the most difficult things I’ve ever wrestled with. My father is bravely battling cancer. The country I love is taking what I feel to be massive steps backwards. I’ve spent many a dark hour thinking about what’s slowly slipping away.

Continue reading →

Royal Hub-capping III

Royal Hub-capping III

Featured Image: HRH Prince Charles, David R Bath & Vivian C Bath in 1968; probably at a Scone Polo Function? They all appear to be enjoying themselves immensely? Perhaps the future King Charles III felt relaxed in this company? It’s likely the future Monarch was staying at the White family home ‘Belltrees’ as he had in the past.

David & HRH were about the same age? I think this was the only occasion on which they met.

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/royal-hub-capping/

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/royal-hub-capping-ii/

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/royal-hub-capping-iii/

Warialda Jockey Club

Warialda Jockey Club

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/tucka-tucka-dispersal-sale-1899/

Included with the Private Catalogue of owner Mr J R Smith at the Tucka Tucka Stud Dispersal Sale, Yetman, Macintyre River, NSW; March 1st, 1899 I find a very detailed, laborious and extensive (6 generations) hand-written pedigree of ‘Maltese Cross’ by ‘Oxford’ ex ‘Valetta’. On the reverse side is the field for ‘The Fourteen Hands Handicap (14.0)’; possibly at Warialda Jockey Club? Perhaps someone might recognise it? Underneath there is also a hand-written note: J. R. Smith esq., C/- Tattersall’s Club.

Featured Image: The field for ‘The Fourteen Hands Handicap (14.0)’

The prizemoney on offer was 25 sovereigns; roughly $52:50! Continue reading →

Moonan Mail Coach late 1800s

Moonan Mail Coach late 1800s

Featured Image: Moonan Mail Coach

The identity of the driver is not recorded but may have been one of the three Pinkerton brothers although they were contracted to deliver the mail ‘to be conveyed on horseback’?

All three Pinkerton Brothers (David, William, James) distributed mail along the ‘track’

(Reproduced by kind permission of Scone & Upper Hunter Historical Society and ‘Pioneers of a Great Valley’)

William Pinkerton arrived aboard the ship ‘Lloyds’ on 4 September 1856 and married Elizabeth Dunbar (born in Scone) in 1863 at St Luke’s. Elizabeth was the daughter of Samuel Dunbar who arrived with the Millers and his wife Elizabeth (nee Parsons) who lived at ‘Gum Flat’, Gundy. William was sponsored to Australia by William Dumaresq of St Aubins. William selected a ‘Conditional Purchase’ of 40 acres, near Gundy on 15 April 1862 and built ‘Gum Flat’, his family property. The farm was eventually resumed and ‘drowned’ when Glenbawn Dam was constructed. Like his brother David, William acquired the mail contract from Scone to Moonan Brook twice weekly between 1869 and 1875 ‘to be conveyed on horseback’ with a stop at Gundy from 1875. At this time Gundy was a thriving village with three churches, a school, Literary Institute, two general stores, post office, hotel, baker, butcher, blacksmith and wheelwright. It would have been self-sufficient. William and Ann produced at least 11 registered children and there may have been two others? Both William and Ann survived well into their 70s and are buried in the Church of England cemetery in Scone.

James Pinkerton had married Mary MacCallum on 8 August 1844 at Barakell in Ireland and they had a family of nine children when they arrived in Australia in the early 1860s. James’ exact arrival date is unknown but Mary and the children arrived on the ‘Fairlie’ on 29 April 1863. James had come ahead of them and they settled in the Gundy district. James built a small cottage before acquiring ‘Tanborough’ on the Hunter River east of the village of Gundy under the ‘Conditional Purchase’ system which became the family home. Like his younger siblings before him James acquired the mail contract from Scone to Moonan Brook in 1868. James was a renowned horseman and once at age 64 won a ‘challenge race’ between Moonan Brook and Scone when he may have substituted one pie bald mount for another fresh one? A ‘ring in’ at the races began very early! Both James (84 at Gundy) and Mary (90 at Moonan Flat) lived to a great age. Both are buried in the Gundy General Cemetery. James and Mary had eleven children. The Pinkerton dynasty is an expansive one in the Upper Hunter Valley and many direct descendants still call the district home.

Melbourne Cup Extravaganza @ Scone October 2010

Melbourne Cup Extravaganza @ Scone October 2010

Featured Image: I’m holding aloft the Melbourne Cup won by ‘Poitrel’ in 1920.

See: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/poitrel/

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/colloquium-of-cups-2010/

See also: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/melbourne-cup-150th-anniversary-tour-15th-october-2010/

This is one of the most famous of Melbourne Cups. I ‘borrowed’ it from Tim Moses of ‘Tralee’, Inverell; his father R L ‘Tiggy’ Moses inherited from his father R F Moses of ‘Fairways Stud, Muswellbrook. His father was F A Moses of ‘Arrowfield’, Jerrys Plains who owned and bred the horse with his brother W Moses. Tim was ‘apologetic’ about losing the wooden plinth or base? He needn’t have been. There wasn’t one! The plinth wasn’t added to the Cup until two or three years later.

Poitrel

The featured image is from a painting by Martin Stainforth in the possession of the artist.

Chestnut Horse 1914 by St Alwyne (imp.) out of Poinard. Winner of £26,919, including Melbourne Cup carrying 10st. (!) and all the principal long distance weight-for-age races in Australia. ‘Poitrel’ was a very high class stayer. He retired to his owners’ (Messrs. W. and F. A. Moses ‘Arrowfield Stud’) in 1921. Later he relocated to L.K.S. Mackinnon’s Maribyrnong Stud, Melbourne.

‘Poitrel’ was one of the greatest racehorses and sires of the early 20th century. His win in the Melbourne Cup carrying the massive impost of 10st still evokes disbelief in the most hardened of commentators.

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poitrel

See also: Poitrel | Racing Victoria

Continue reading →

Summary of Australia’s 1975 Yearling Sales

Featured Image:

Australian Bloodhorse Bulletin September 1975. Published by the Bloodhorse Breeders’ Association of Australia

Page 8

With the blinding coruscating glitz of the Magic Millions extravaganza for 2022 fast approaching on the Gold Coast it might be time to reflect on the remarkably steep upward inflationary spiral which has benefited the thoroughbred industry in Australia within 50 years.

The average price for yearlings actually sold in Australia in 1975 (2532) was $4,210:00; down on 1974 = $5357:00 for 2372 lots sold. The stake money for the Melbourne Spring Racing Carnival in 1975 was a projected total of $2,120,000:00.

Morag Bain and young family

Featured Image:

Morag Campbell (nee Bain) plus daughters Gigha (5) and Skye (4) at Scone Races in October 1979. Mrs John Clift (Kia Ora) and Mrs Wendy Bowman (Singleton) are ‘debating’ in the background.

The following year (March 1980) Morag was co-owner with her mother Mrs Mace Bain and sister Fiona in the STC Golden Slipper winner ‘Dark Eclipse’ (Baguette ex Marjoram).

Murray Bain’s Unfulfilled Dream

Featured Image: ‘Eulogy’ of Murray Bain in 1974 written by famous racing journalist Bert Lillye in 1974 (Sydney Morning Herald)

I think Bert says it all? Despite the mildly morbid title I think Murray achieved much of what he set out to do. His legacy is profound.

The ‘dream’ small thoroughbred stud Bert describes was actually ‘home’ to 1980 Golden Slipper winner ‘Dark Eclipse’ (Baguette ex Marjoram) bred and raced by Mace, Morag and Fiona Bain and trained by Neville Begg.

See: https://sconevetdynasty.com.au/dark-eclipse-golden-slipper-stakes-winner-1980/